Lectures on Iconography-Next Lecturer October 6th at 7pm. Rev. Stefanos Alexopoulos, Ph.D; Medieval Byzantine Scrolls of the Office of Holy Communion: Is Form Related to Function?

 Next Lecture: Medieval Byzantine Scrolls of the Office of Holy Communion:

Is Form Related to Function?

by Rev. Stefanos Alexopoulos, Ph.D
Come join the discussion!
Suggested donations :$10
Here or at the door . . .

 Short Bio

Fr. Stefanos was born in Zimbabwe, raised in South Africa and Greece, and received his higher education in the United States, earning a B.A. in Religious Studies from Hellenic College, a M.Div. from Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology, both in Brookline, MA., and a Ph.D. in Liturgical Studies from the University of Notre Dame. Fr. Stefanos then returned to Greece where he served as a parish priest and taught for the College Year in Athens Program, for the Greco-Roman Program of St. John’s University/St. Benedict’s College, Collegeville, MN, and for the Pastoral Institute of the Archdiocese of Athens, Church of Greece. In 2009 he was elected Assistant Professor of Liturgy at the Ecclesiastical Academy of Athens. In the Spring of 2012 he was invited to teach at the Institute of Sacred Music at Yale University as a visiting professor. His work has appeared in English, Greek, German and Russian.. He is a member of the North American Academy of Liturgy and the Society of Oriental Liturgy. Since 2009 is actively involved in the new Catalogue of Byzantine Manuscripts project out of the Protestant Theological University (Holland). He is an ordained Greek Orthodox priest (the son and grandson of priests), and since 2010 has been appointed full member of the Special Synodical Committee on Liturgical Renewal of the Holy Synod of the Church of Greece. Fr. Stefanos joined the Faculty of the School of the Theology and Religious Studies at Catholic University of America in the Fall of 2013.

 

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Not all of the opinions of our lecturers reflect the views of the Center for Byzantine Material Arts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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